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Sexual Health Roundup: Mail-Order Condoms and Viagra, and a Sex Toy Race in Vegas

A mail-order condom program for teens in California expanded last week to include San Diego and Fresno counties. The Condom Access Project was launched last year by the California Family Health Council in an effort to reduce teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease (STD) rates across the state. It already operates in parts of San Francisco, as well as Alameda, Sacramento, San Joaquin, and Kern counties. Teenagers in those areas can request up to ten condoms a month by filling out an online form. The program also provides condoms for distribution to 65 organizations that serve young people https://viagra-las-vegas.com/.

Many citizens and sexual health experts support the program. Dr. Cora Hoover, the assistant health officer in San Joaquin County told ABC News, “Increased availability of condoms through the Condom Access Project is an important strategy to reduce STDs and unintended pregnancies for youth in our county.” Jennifer Coburn, director of communication at Planned Parenthood of Pacific Southwest, also spoke to ABC News and explained why the mail-order option is important: “I think it’s [about] embarrassment, but if you haven’t been to a Planned Parenthood it might be a scary prospect to go to a reproductive health center.”

When the national media heard about the expansion of the program, however, it focused on the fact that condoms can be obtained by individuals as young as 12. CNN ran a story with the headline “Free condoms for your 12-year-old? California health council can help” and Fox’s story on the topic began with the sentence, “Middle-school California kids, now you can be as sexually profligate as you want to be.”

People who are worried that making condoms available to middle school students will encourage sex can calm down. First, only 6 percent of high school students in San Diego had sex before age 13, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBS). Though 12-year-olds may make headlines, it is likely that most teens using this service, which distributed approximately 30,000 condoms last year, are older. And older teens in San Diego (42.5 percent of all high school students) are having sex. Moreover, research has consistently shown that condom availability programs do not make students any more likely to have sex but do make them more likely to use condoms when are sexually active.

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